Breastfeeding- Who’s Conflicted?

When my babies were born, I remember being unsure of what to do. Not just with feeding, but with so many other aspects of parenting.   Bedtime, bathing, breastfeeding, pediatrician appointments, and sleep habits…the list goes on and on. The more questions I had, the more opinions I received. Or so it seemed. And this was BEFORE Google really kicked in to solve all of our problems.

One of the biggest complaints I get from new parents is the lack of consistency in the information they are given. From what they read online to what they read in books and blogs, information from nurses to advice from family…no 2 pieces of information are the same.   In our society now, people are disconnected from each other. Where we used to count on generations of family to be the “village”, so many have moved away from home to settle somewhere else. Technology is how we stay in touch and how we keep connected. With babies, it is still necessary to have the human interaction that has kept us connected for hundreds of years.

This week on the Badass Breastfeeding Podcast, we talk about this very thing. How conflicting information can be detrimental to the breastfeeding relationship between the mother/baby dyad. How can you know who to listen to and what advice to follow? Tune in and find out. I will give you a hint – it’s not as complicated as you might think.

 http://BadAssBreastfeedingPodcast.buzzsprout.com

*If you like what you hear, leave a review! Thank you!

 

Birth of the Badass Breastfeeding Podcast

Sometimes it seems as if there is never enough hours in the day. I remember a time when it didn’t seem like life was so jam-packed with stuff to do. If it’s not about work, its kids, or pets, or the house…as overwhelming as it seems at times, sometimes I wonder if I do better with a plate that is always full. I think I am one of those people who just like to take on more and more. Bring on the challenge of yet another project! I’m the girl who wrote papers in college at the last minute (always turned out fine). Now that I am in the real world, I take things right up until the deadline before I finish. My mom always said that I do best when I fly by the seat of my pants.

That being said, I decided that I didn’t have enough going on and I should start a podcast. I met Abby at a conference a couple months ago. She was doing a keynote presentation and I was doing a breakout session. I didn’t think about a podcast at first, but once I got home and reached out to her via email, it just seemed like a good thing to try.

Abby is known as the Badass Breastfeeder. Breastfeeding advocate extraordinaire. It’s only fitting that we would have so much to share with the world in regards to breastfeeding, babies, parenting, and the social issues that may surround all of the above.   It made sense to join efforts with a podcast. Why should you listen to this podcast? Well, first of all, because it’s badass. If that isn’t reason enough, how about being able to weigh in on the topics that are chosen? We welcome your feedback, and offer up our email for listeners to make suggestions on what they want to hear. We talk about real life issues surrounding breastfeeding, in a way that all new families can relate to. It feels like we are sitting there with you, offering to answer your questions and solve your problems. Admit it, this is the breastfeeding podcast that you’ve been waiting for. So click the link below and subscribe. You’ll be glad you did.

 http://BadAssBreastfeedingPodcast.buzzsprout.com

 

Babies who Bite – What to do when baby is teething?

I have noticed over the last several years that breastfeeding problems seem to come in waves. I might have one month when most of the issues are sore nipples and latch problems. Other months I might see more babies with slow weight gain. More recently, I have had several mothers complain about teething and biting babies.

During pregnancy, when a woman is asked about breastfeeding often the answer I hear is “I will breastfeed until the baby gets teeth”. Well, babies do still have to eat even when teeth start coming in. Once you are aware of what to look for with your teething baby, the whole idea doesn’t seem quite as dangerous.

One of the difficult ideas behind teething is that you don’t really know when it will start, and it is different for every baby. Have 5 babies? Experience teething in 5 different ways. It’s hard to get around that. Babies can also show signs of teething for months before you actually see that little tooth come through. As uncomfortable as this may be for you and breastfeeding, it is probably worse for your little one. In addition, nursing may bring your baby comfort if teething is uncomfortable, or help him back to sleep if he wakes during the night with teething pain.

Not every baby will bite when breastfeeding. Some may bite once, and the shriek of pain that comes from their mom may be enough to put a stop to it. The one thing to remember is that if baby is biting, she is not feeding. Let me repeat that – if baby is biting, she is not feeding. For a baby to feed effectively, her tongue must be over the gum line (and the teeth) and that is not possible when nursing.   I have found that by the time a baby gets to the stage where they are teething, most mothers are comfortable enough that they are not watching their baby as closely as they did when they were newborns. You may need to limit all the other distractions and go back to looking at only your baby. Once the nursing slows down, take baby off before he can start biting.

Check out this article for more ideas for babies who might be challenged with feeding and teething. It gives more great suggestions for getting through this developmental period comfortably…not only for your baby but for mothers as well.

http://kellymom.com/ages/older-infant/biting/

Self-Care in Motherhood

Ah…motherhood.  The excitement of pregnancy and the anticipation of that little one entering your life.  These feelings of enthusiasm can be quickly replaced by exhaustion and anxiety.   It can take a while before you are feeling in control again.  How can you keep up?  The idea of self- care can feel light years away.

Whether you are someone who managed to build self-care into your regime before the baby was born, or someone who is now struggling to maintain sanity in the face of sleep deprivation, self – care can be life saving.   It doesn’t matter what your idea of this looks like.  Maybe a few minutes to take a walk by yourself, or a hot bath.  Maybe it’s an evening out with friends…without the baby.  Whatever it is, recognize that this is a very needed, therapeutic piece of parenthood.

My kids have all crossed over into the world of teenagers in the last few months.  Thinking back on their early years, self- care was not something I did much of.  I was going through a divorce when my kids were toddlers, and it was difficult trying to find time for myself.  Now that it is much easier to actually find that time, I feel those familiar pangs of guilt setting in.

“…there’s laundry to be done…and here you are at the gym…”

“…getting your toes done?  You should be vacuuming something…”

My mind taunts me.  Needless to say, my inner self almost always wins.   I can always find an excuse to NOT do something for myself.  I am the perfect example of “do as I say and not as I do”.

Now that I have been working in maternal child health as a lactation consultant for several years, I have seen the importance of taking time out for you.  I have heard countless therapists discuss the importance of self-care.  I have learned first hand that if you are able to work this in from the start; it becomes easier to continue as time goes on.  Since this can be difficult to do, I am including some tips to get you started.  These are very easy things you can do to make time for yourself.  You’ll be glad you did.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jennifer-s-white/6-things-moms-should-do-for-themselves-as-often-as-possible_b_11363962.html

The 5 Worst States for Breastfeeding Moms – And the 5 Best

More moms in the U.S. are breastfeeding than ever before, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 4 out of 5 kids were breastfed at birth in 2013, around 81.1 percent, up from 79 percent in 2011. And almost one-third of children born in 2013, 30.7 percent, were still nursing at 12 months, compared to just 27 percent in 2011.

These improvements of several percentage points (representing hundreds of thousands of benefitting babies) show that a greater number of moms want to nurse and have the resources to keep it up. But unfortunately, doing so is easier in certain parts of the country than others. Some 50 percent of new moms stop nursing by the 6 month-mark and two-thirds by 12 months. It happens most often due to a lack of support from employers, healthcare providers and family.

The CDC pulled together a list of states where breastfeeding for the recommended 12 months is the hardest, based on how well the state’s hospitals integrate breastfeeding practices into maternity care; the number of births in “baby-friendly” hospitals; the number of infants receiving formula within 2 days of life; the number of La Leche league leaders and lactation consultants; and whether childcare facilities support onsite breastfeeding.

(It doesn’t take into account public nursing laws or workplace policies – but know that every state except for Idaho has laws explicitly allowing you to nurse wherever you want, and the Affordable Care Act requires employers to provide nursing employees with a private space to pump that’s not a bathroom.)

These are the worst states to be a nursing mom:

  • Mississippi
  • Arkansas
  • Nebraska
  • Alabama
  • Tennessee

These are the best states to be a nursing mom:

  • Rhode Island
  • New Hampshire
  • Delaware
  • Vermont
  • Massachusetts

Even if you’re living in a state with fewer breastfeeding resources, a dearth of baby-friendly hospitals doesn’t have to keep you from nursing for as long as you want. A recent survey found that asking your care provider about breastfeeding before you give birth, ideally in the third trimester, is a strong indicator of success. And once your newborn has arrived, you get another source of support in your child’s pediatrician.

You can also work with an international lactation consultant in your area. With fewer choices, you’ll be less likely to find one by word of mouth, but a quick search on the International Lactation Consultant Association website should help turn up someone close enough for you to meet with at least once.

And last, talking to moms who’ve been through it before has endless benefits. You might uncover a tip your male OB had never heard, and you’ll be reminded your struggle is totally normal.

U.S. breastfeeding rates are steadily approaching global children’s health goals, but we still need to focus on getting every mom the support she needs to feed her baby exactly the way she wants.

Source: http://www.whattoexpect.com/wom/baby/worst-states-for-breastfeeding-moms-2016
Image Source: Jamie Grill/Getty